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Gluten Intolerance

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Do you suffer from diarrhea? Gas? Bloating? Abdominal pain? Some people live with these symptoms on a daily basis and don’t even realize that they are suffering from food intolerance, one of the most common being gluten...

Gluten is the combination of two proteins, gliadin and glutenin, which exist in varying amounts in the endosperm (the inside) of most grass related grains, such as wheat and rye. These proteins give dough its elasticity, allow leavening, and keeps baked goods chewy and cohesive.

Gluten intolerance varies in severity, from mild to a severe intolerance, called Celiac’s disease. Symptoms include diarrhea, bloating, cramping, abdominal pain and vomiting 1-3 hours after consumption of gluten containing foods. Gluten is considered a complex protein, meaning it contains two or more chains of individual proteins. It is a large molecule, one of the reasons that it is difficult for our digestive systems to handle. When gluten molecules reach the small intestine, they can actually cause small holes in the mucosal lining, creating something called Leaky gut syndrome. Normally the lining of our gut selectively filters through the contents of the intestine, absorbing the nutrients we need and allows everything else to pass through to be eliminated as waste. When the gut lining is compromised, foreign particles are able to pass through and into the bloodstream. This causes the immune system to get involved, as it sets out to attack these foreign materials. The intestinal damage causes malnutrition, deficient absorption of nutrients and fat. Symptoms such as rash, anemia, weight loss, steatorrhea (smelly and shiny stool), bone pain and osteoporosis, frequent colds, mood swings, and a host of others, are all due to a lack of nutrients.

Gluten is also an additive and acts as a stabilizing agent in products where it is unexpected, such as ice cream, and ketchup. It is these products that can make gluten free diets so challenging for those who suffer from intolerances.Gluten containing foods are as follows: barley, oats, rye, wheat, spelt, kamut, hydrolysed vegetable protein, texturized vegetable protein, hydrolysed plant protein malt, modified food starch, some soy sauces, grain vinegars, binders, fillers, some natural flavours, hot dogs, gravies, luncheon meat, beer, mustard, ketchup, non-dairy creamer, white vinegar, processed foods, bouillon cubes, chocolate, bottled salad dressing, curry powder and seasonings.

Be cautious with oats. Although there are now many brands that certify their oats as gluten free, many other companies transport, prepare and package their oats alongside many gluten containing grains. Cross-contamination is very common.

Gluten intolerance symptoms can occur in infancy but depending on the severity, sometimes they do not present until adulthood. This is a genetically inherited disorder – infants can have a failure to thrive as a symptom. When gluten intolerance presents in adulthood, it is often triggered by some kind of stressor (emotional, mental or physical). Symptoms will stop once the gut lining is healed through the removal of gluten containing foods from the diet. There are some people who can reintroduce small amounts of gluten into their body without adverse side effects but many remain on a gluten free diet for their entire lives.

Individuals with gluten intolerance are advised to eat a healthy diet, including fruits and vegetables, lean protein such as fish and poultry, healthy fats and gluten free grains, including rice, corn, millet, quinoa, potato and soy. The following list of supplements can be used for preventing, and repairing damage from gluten intolerance.

 

What you can do to help maintain Gluten Intolerance :

  •  MAKE SURE TO READ ALL INGREDIANTS
  •  BE AWARE OF CROSS CONTAMINATION WITH GLUTEN PRODUCTS
  •  EAT A HEALTHY DIET OF FRUITS VEGETABLES AND LEAN PROTEIN
  •  WHEN DINING OUT MAKE SURE TO INFORM THE WAITER OF YOUR CONDITION

Gluten Intolerance Quick Facts

  •  SYMPTOMS CAN BE BLOATING, PAIN, GAS, CONSTIPATION, DIARRHEA
  •  TRAUMA AND STRESS PLAY A ROLE IN WORSENING SYMPTOMS
  •  GLUTEN INTOLERANCE AFFECTS APPROX. 15% OF THE US POPULATION
  •  IT MAY BE MORE DIFFICULT FOR SOMEONE WITH A GLUTEN INTOLERANCE TO ABSORB NUTRIENTS
Nutritional Information
supplementdosagetherapeutic effect
digestive enzymestake as directed before meals these may be severely depleted with gluten intolerance. they aid in the proper digestion of food.
essential fatty acids, (omega 3 fish oils)1tsp/ day or more individuals with gluten intolerance are often deficient in fats and fat soluble vitamins. they also reduce inflammation and promote healing of the intestinal cells.
multivitamin and mineral complexas directed to correct deficiencies and promote healing. those with sever deficiencies may require higher amounts until the deficiencies are corrected.
multi-starin probiotics, including acidophilustake as directed, usually 1-3 capsules/day reduces irritation of the intestinal walls.
glutamine2000-5000 mg/day in divided doses to help repair and soothe the intestinal wall.
vitamin c with bioflavanoids1000 mg 3x/day. try ester c, as it is less acidic to help stabilize the inflammatory response. supports mucus membranes.
for informational purposes only. please consult your health care practitioner before taking natural health care products. click here for full disclaimer.

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